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5 tips to help you overcome the fear of rejection

The best B2B sellers aren't necessarily the ones who are the most fearless. They're usually the ones who have learned how to pivot quickly and move forward strategically even on bad days when contacting a prospect feels like a Herculean task. Fear, after all, is a part of life, yet being able to move through it is an essential skill for success in the field of B2B sales. Here are 5 strategies to help you reduce any inertia or resistance you're experiencing:

  1. Focus On Service: Approach your outreaches and interactions as opportunities to help/serve others rather than just "lead gen". Focus on understanding your prospect's needs and how your expertise and know-how can help them succeed.

  2. Change Your Stories: Instead of viewing a "no" as an epic personal failure, see it as nothing more than just a "No, thanks" or "Not right now".

  3. Practice An Abundance Mindset: An abundance mindset focused on the idea that there are plenty of opportunities available and that success is achievable for both you and your clients. This mindset moves us away from a fear of limited resources, competition, and missed opportunities, which oftentimes can generate a sense of desperation that repels prospective clients.

  4. Set Realistic Expectations: Understand that not every prospect will be a perfect fit for your offering. It's more than okay to encounter rejection because you're looking for mutually beneficial partnerships with the right clients. Keeping your focus on alignment will help you move away from the fear of rejection or lack.

  5. Start Small: If you're feeling overwhelmed by inertia or fear right now, break down your sales process into smaller, achievable goals. Celebrate each step you take towards your ultimate goal, even if it's not an immediate "yes" from your prospective clients. This can help you stay motivated and reduce the fear of facing rejection.


Last but not least, give yourself compassion and grace. As Jack Kornfield wrote, "If your compassion does not include yourself, it is incomplete."

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